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Bad Web Design Isn’t Just Annoying—It Costs You

’s bestselling book, Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, has a provocative thesis. Contrary to commonsense, which warns against “snap judgments,” Gladwell argues that, often, our automatic, largely unconscious way of making decisions throughout the day is a fairly reliable way to navigate life in the modern world. “There can be as much value in the blink of eye,” writes Gladwell, “as in months of rational analysis.”

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5 Ways Entrepreneurs Can Rebound After a Crisis

rebounding after crisis

The current pandemic is dramatically impacting American small businesses and entrepreneurs. According to a recent report, almost 7.5 million of America’s approximately 30 million small businesses may be forced to close permanently over the next several months. However, many believe that – like other “black swan” events – the COVID-19 pandemic will fuel the next wave of innovation, and more resilient and world-changing startups than ever before.

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The Future of Work is Here

the future of work

An Introduction to a Series of Articles

(1st article in a series)

THE FUTURE OF WORK IS HERE

Many organizations and thought leaders are attempting to predict the future of work during this time of unprecedented change. We are experiencing the end of the Industrial Era and the rapid rise of the Age of Digital Dominance. This article summarizes a series of articles written to add information and energy to a growing movement committed to finding solutions that will drive economic development and prosperity for workers, businesses and communities in rural and middle America. The other articles include: 1) The Transformation is Inevitable: 2) Winners and Losers; 3) Organizations of the Future; and 4) The Age of Digital Dominance. (Author note: These articles were originally written six months before Covid-19 hit. The pandemic will only accelerate the trends described).

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The Transformation is Inevitable

THE TRANSFORMATION IS INEVITABLE—The Industrial Era gives way to the Age of Digital Dominance

(2nd article in a series)

During the next decade, industries, local economies and the nature of work will be transformed on a massive scale and at an accelerating pace. In the U.S., 40% of our workforce is employed in an occupation that could see significant job losses(1).  Although many new jobs will be created, the net impact on jobs will be felt unevenly by industries, communities and workers. Rural and middle America that prospered during the Industrial Era are at a greater risk in the Age of Digital Dominance, as many jobs requiring lower skills will be disproportionally disrupted by six unstoppable forces.

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Winners and Losers

WINNERS AND LOSERS—Jobs and Communities at Risk in the Age of Digital Dominance

(3nd article in a series)

In the future of work, there will be winners and losers. During the next decade, industries, local economies and the nature of work will be transformed on a massive scale and at an accelerating pace. In the U.S., 40% of our workforce is employed in occupations that could see significant job losses(1).  Although many new jobs will be created, the net impact on jobs will be felt unevenly by industries, communities and workers. Rural and middle America that prospered during the Industrial Era are at a greater risk in the Age of Digital Dominance. Many jobs requiring lower skills will be disproportionally disrupted. The new jobs created will favor those communities connected and committed to the future of work having made investments in digital and social infrastructure, business development, work-related skills-based training, and tax incentives.

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Organizations of The Future

ORGANIZATIONS OF THE FUTURE—Step Aside Boomers, Millennials are Taking Over

(4th article in a series – by Duncan Robins)

ORGANIZATIONS OF THE FUTURE ARE BEING FORMED TODAY

In the near future, competition will be so fierce in the winners-take-all global market that corporations will be forced to break with their rigid, Industrial Era, organizational structures. They will need workforces that are more agile with higher skills, less segmented by function, and more able to assemble quickly, in small teams when needed. Corporations will have to work with skeptical Millennials, who have much different values and working styles than their parents. These two powers may be in tension, but they are also proving that new working arrangements, ones that defy current norms and test existing laws, will benefit both corporations and their prized, Millennial workers. However, not all workers will enjoy the spoils of the new working paradigms, as many will be left on the other side of the widening Digital and Educational Divides in the Age of Digital Dominance.

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